Tuesday, April 21, 2009

This Land Is Your Land

You don't have to look far to find "green news" these days (in fact, all you need to do is check our blog). And while there's positive green news to share (a community garden, a new wind farm, etc.), there's also lots of depressing stuff coming across the wire, too. Lots. Need an example? See the slideshow at:

http://lifestyle.msn.com/your-life/living-green/staticslideshowgreenchan.asp
x?cp-documentid=18995575>1=45002

...allow me to sum it up: yuck! Basically, this is a coast-to-coast rundown of some of the most pollution-filled places in the U.S. (never mind the "muck factories" dotting the globe - same of which paradoxically provide us with the goods and luxuries we enjoy all around us, but that's another story altogether). The article covers air (L.A.'s smog), land (Colorado's mining district, the soil of which contains high levels of cadmium, lead and arsenic, to name a few) and water pollution (the Gulf of Mexico's ever-increasing levels of "agricultural runoff" supplied by the Mississippi River).

A lot of these places, the EPA calls them "superfund" sites, because they qualify for gobs of money and broad federal authority to clean them up - because they pose a serious danger to public health (we're talking hazmat suits). And believe me, we've done some serious environmental damage in our 233 years: as of this past December 12, there are 1,255 of these sites on the National Priority List and 63 new sites proposed. Yikes.

None of the highlighted locations are near me (thankfully), but that's not to say the article makes me feel all warm and fuzzy inside, either. Like Woody Guthrie sang, this land is your land, this land is my land; and reading this article, I'm reminded of our environmental responsibility. I hate to sound all goody-goody, but it's true: if we all roll up our sleeves, just a little, we can make a difference. Example: it may not make a big impact, but when I'm biking and I have the Croozer with me, I'll toss whatever bottles and cans that litter the road into it so I can recycle them at home. Think globally, act locally, right? Just a thought for the day...

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